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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 56 (some duplicates have been removed)
causing trouble for many days. welcome to gnt. coming up in the program, thousands of protesters in jordan demonstrated demanding political reform and new elections called by the king. he wears it well. 50 years since 007 hit the silver screen. we bring you nostalgias with the world's most famous -- nostalgia with the world's most famous spy. the turkish government insists it will respond forcefully to any of cells on -- assaults by syria on the turkish people. the country does not intend to start a war with syria but he has the backing of parliament to act with force if necessary. the turkish foreign minister spokesmen told the bbc it was in syria's hands to insure calm returned to the area. >> there were schelling's in the last 10 days. -- shelling in the last 10 days. the thelling was huge -- the shelling was huge and painful. we do not want to declare a war, but we have to prepare for any eventuality to protect our citizens. >> we are in the border area with our correspondents in just a few minutes. let's have a look at some of the other stories making headlines around the world. ameri
to be in jordan. -- the day that osama bin laden was killed, i happened to be in jordan i saw students out there chanting "usa!" these are young people who were children at the time of the 9/11 attack, most of whom were probably too young to remember those attacks directly as conscious beings. they know it as a part of history. and i don't think that, if we want to be a nation founded on justice, a nation founded on laws, that assassination is a way to do that. this was a huge crime against humanity, what happened on september 11. bringing the perpetrators to justice is a noble goal, a fascinating, the of the perpetrator who is not physically there, but who was inspiring the action is not such a noble thing in my mind. jordanians and palestinians in jordan, many of whom have suffered far more at the hands al qaeda-tech militants even then we have, they were not thrilled at the idea that there was an assassination of this kind because they have seen the consequences of assassination. it is not a question of should somebody be arrested, brought to trial, the be imprisoned for life. absolutel
. word from initials jordan they foiled an attack by a group related to al-qaeda. apparently a group of 11 militants, a cell watching. they thought there would be an attempt suicide attack at shopping malls and western diplomats. we're working on that but it's coming with a lot of detail from state tv in jordan. they've broken up a group of 11 militants linked to al-qaeda. the plan was to blow up some shopping malls or set off explosions. with that distraction in place, carry out attempted suicide bombings and assassinations of foreign diplomats in the area. as we get this confirmed at fox and get more information, we'll let you know. >>> monday is the final presidential debate before the voters head to the polls. the focus is on foreign affairs. the attack on the u.s. embassy on libya will get a lot of attention. joining us, senator barrasso from wyoming. thank you for making time for us today. >> great to be with you. >> you had strong words weeks ago but what you thought happened in libya and the aftermath. now that we have more information, you've been briefed. what do you think
. benjamin netanyahu says he has every right to build in this area. in jordan and explosion has killed a least 10 people and injured dozens more. this was the old city center of damascus. and it is also a christian minority section. there were talks with u.n. peace talks about the civil war. >> coming up on kron 4 news weekend much more news when we come back . among the 49ers are off. however that big game for the giants. the jaguars are planning at the coliseum. cal was defeated last night. curry was pre-injured on friday night. this was part of the same ankle that kept him out of the 40 games last year. this injury continues. they are hoping that he is going to be able to play this season. he also to renter re-enter the season bu the game--but he was held up as a precaution. the official season for their team starts october 31st. >> the diamondbacks picked up some of center fielder choice packs. they say that this does not necessarily mean that the current center fielder coco crisp is an series. >> louisville slugger is continuing a 100 your tradition. they have made that for the wo
him is that he was the principal, secret negotiator of the israel/jordan peace treaty, and it's easy to forget that, that role, but it is important to understand how crucial that peace treaty is now as the region is so volatile. there's a bit of good news today, i'm told the new egyptian ambassador to israel came today to announce that israel -- that egypt will abide by the peace treaty, will abide by the peace treaty with israel, but we have relied on the peace treaty, israel has relied on it, and so have we, for many years. as haleh said, we watch developments in the middle east very closely here. the president of yemen came a few weeks ago to speak about a way forward for his country which is trying hard to become a strong ally in the fight against terrorism and has huge economic challenges. we just held the second of three meetings on how women are faring in the arab awakening. last month a former deputy secretary of state and ambassador tom pickering and other senior national security officials, military officers and experts with decades of middle east experience presented a rep
sympathizes or agrees with terrorists. >> thank you. >> we now go to the gentleman from ohio, mr. jordan. could you kweeld necessity ten seconds for a quick question? let's understand what you are saying here today is that one piece of intel, one piece of infell got you guys, yourself and secretary rice or ambassador rice, to make a wrong statement five or six days later and still be making it because sunday is a long time after tuesday. you are saying you got it wrong and you didn't know any better. is that right? >> the information that was availab available. >> ambassador, you're a great witness historically. i asked you did you have any contrary knowledge over those five days? that's all -- >> no, sir. >> okay. you didn't know any better for the next five days is your testimony. thank you, mr. jordan. >> mr. chairman, may i ask the consent that we give equal time to mr. cummings to respond and then give mr. jordan his full five minutes? >> mr. chairman, on that request -- >> to be honest -- mr. jordan. >> point of order. >> are you requesting time? >> point of order. >> i guess unani
and jordan river, a state connected by a highly developed infrastructure of roads and water pipelines. i'm not sure when the point of return was passed, seven years ago, my first visit to israel, it was plausible to speak of the palestinian state. now did -- now it does not. a democratic process, appointment of envoys searching for commonground, building on previous agreements like those arrived at under the prime minister don't have chance of success. there's no political majority in israel in favor of withdrawing from the territory and settlements israel would have to do to allow a genuinely economically viable palestinian state. benjamin netanyahu gave lip service to the idea, but people close to him said he would never offer the palestinians something he could accept. the west bank, areas a and b, cut off from the world without control of the air space, their water will not produce a viable state. what can the next president do to change this? the only intervention that could shake israel out of the current spiral would be if a president made clear where the united states sees this h
the border with syria and jordan. washington has been insisting that we are not going to directly intervene. dinesh d'souza is here to tell us what is going on in obama's america and with our troops abroad. the supreme court takes up the question of the future of affirmative action. shannon bream was there for the argument and she will be next with the report. for many, nexium helps relieve heartburn symptoms caused by acid refl disease. osteoporosis-related bone fractures and low magnesium levels have been seen with nexium. possible side effects include headache, dirhea, d abdominal pain. other serious stomach conditions may still exist. talk to your doctor about nexium. lou: the obama justice department rejecting claims that the south carolina law that requires voters to show photo id discriminate against minorities, since there is four weeks remain to election day. that law will not be allowed to go into effect until, however, next year. arguments in the supreme court case today could change affirmative action policies. shannon bream has the report. >> what we want? diversity. >> today,
egypt and jordan. we seek to forge peace with the palestinians. president abbas just spoke here. we will not solve our conflicts with libel speeches at the u.n. we have to sit together and negotiate together and reach a mutual compromise in which a palestinian state recognizes the one and only jewish state. [applause] israel wants to see middle east progress and peace. we want to see the three great legions that sprang forth from -- judaism, christianity, and is -- judaism, christianity, and is
seen strikes in lebanon. there have been a flow of refugees? jordan and turkey. we have iranian forces and ed in the fighting. as time goes on we will see more regionalization here. we also have the jihadist coming in from god knows where. >>trace: we have hezbollah, iran is still giving bashar al-assad weapons. it is time that someone, the united states and others, come in and start giving the rebels the tools they need to fight the war? >>guest: it is well past time the united states needs to take more of an active leadership role. these protests started in march of 2012 as peaceful protests. what do we have? we have extremists involved and the regionalization of the conflict. we have not done that much. what are we pressing for now? a u.n. security council resolution that probably is not going to happen. the united states needs to come up with more ideas on how we will resolve this. >>trace: we worry about bashar al-assad leafing but now it appears bashar al-assad is the greater of all evils. thank you, sir. >> if defense contractors send out thousands of letters saying they will ha
questions posed by the michael jordan moderator. you don't want to be belittling our demeaning to the person who asked the question. >> they sent out a big memo this morning going through all of these statements, word by word that romney had made in the first debates, followed by long answers that the president should have given. i mean, it was 2800 words a long memo they went through. >> greta: i got that long memo. i thought oh, brother i've got enough to do today. >> they're in would have, could have, should have mode. it's basically here's what i should have said. i expect that's what the president will say tomorrow night. >> the certainly the element of do-overs in any of the attacks. if big bird gets mentioned again, he'll know exactly what to say this time. i think what makes this unpredictable, the questions will be totally 50sly different. neither candidate wants to retread the ground they went over two weeks ago. they need new areas of attack. >> greta: i'm interested to hearing the libya question, if there is one i'm interested in the answer. panel, thank you. >> thank you. >> gre
on, this is not a beyonce type event. >> a piece of michael jordan history went for a pretty penny at auction this week. it's barbecue sauce. a 1992 jug of mick jordan sauce sold on ebay for $10,000. the unopened one gallon bottle was the sauce used on the mcjordan burger, a promotion that mcdonald's did 20 years ago in honor of the basketball star. it was a quarter pound beef patty, mustard onion and the the barbecue so you say. >> i remember that from when i was a kid new where was it served? >> at mcdonald's. >> bill: really? >> mcjordan. when michael jordan was playing. i remember because it was the firstburg are i had, it was a circular disk that fit right on top of the burger. >> what are you going to do with this barbecue sauce. >> please don't eat it. >> no word on the shelf life. >> back over your driveway with it but don't eat it. >> the detroit tigers are one win away from the world series. in game three last night the tigers beat the new york yankees 2-1 thanks to justin verlander. he gave up his first run in the ninth inning. they took him out. tigers were last in the
ties with the sunni alignment of the sunni gulf states, egypt and jordan and the shia group of iran's syria and hezbollah was not easy especially as tension rose between the two groups. this was to be increasingly clear with the onset of the arab spring. when you look initially at russian concerns in the arab spring, it can spread to russia was efforts on the same problems as the arab states, autocratic government, widespread corruption and rising prices and indeed democracy demonstrators were shouting the revolutionary train stopped at the station in cairo, next stop moscow. the second concern, islam is my takeover and in a ending chaos and further inspire the islamists and north caucasus and increasingly and khe sanh as well. number three is oil and gas investments in the middle east could be jeopardized as well as the business and arms sales deals and number four when libya occurred, the russians i think that the major lesson purgative stained on the u.n. security council vote in the no-fly zone in bolivia thereby supporting the arab consensus and continuing the widened russian p
such as saudi arabia, uae and jordan, and in 2008 he added libya to the expanding arc of activity. putin's goals were fourfold. number one, demonstrate russia was again a major power in the middle east and the world. number two, gain -- for projects while selling sophisticated products like nuclear reactors and railway systems. number three, as the cost and difficulty of extracting russian oil and natural gas grew to gain joint ventures in oil and natural gas extraction with countries like saudi arabia, iran, uae, libya and iraq. and number four and certainly very important, to prevent the arab states from aiding the islamic resistance movements in the north caucuses that were beginning to spread through the rest of russia. but keeping good ties with the sunni alignment in egypt and jordan and the shia group of hezbollah was not easy, especially as tensions rose between the two groups. this was to be increasingly clear with the onset of the arab spring. now, when you look initially at russian concerns with the arab spring, a, it could spread to russia which suffered some of the same problems as
you, sir. >> may i ask we give mr. jordan his full five minutes? >> be honest -- >> i ask yuan mouse consent the member have 15 seconds. >> objection. mr. chairman, with all due respect. you just allowed mr. burton to go over by two minutes and you're giving mr. -- >> i'm sure it's going to balance tout time. >> we have gone over and i'm going to pull it back into five minutes. >> before we get to your part of the day we will get there. >> without objection, the ranking member is given equal time to ask a question, please. >> i want to go back to you ambassador. i think that was a very critical question. mr. norton talked about the five days. can you explain that to us that during that period, five days or whatever it was, not having the information contrary to what ms. rice may have said. i understand it was based on intelligence. but can you explain how that could happen to the public? in other words, were you all still gathering information, what was going on there, do you know? >> mr. comings, we were gathering information from the intelligence community. we wanted to know what w
catch. jordan, palau, palau again. >> reporter: trafficking is a not bail-able offense that carries a life sentence. whether it is a deterrent, though is an open question, in a justice system experts say is plagued by corruption. jeronimo is a prosecutors. he prosecutes the prosecutor, who judges the judge. who polices the corrupt media when everybody is in kahoots. it is a major challenge. >> reporter: president acquino has arrested some high-level officials, and he has instructed some officials like see to upgrade the laws to be more effective against organized crime. >> since we returned from the philippines, they, themselves have come under suspension. a major donor filed a complaint, alleging i improprieties. as the case proceeds to court, she has vowed to continue the work of her agency, which serves thousands of trafficking victims. >> reporter: ironically, some of them, like jenny, just back from syria, see no other option than to take their chances. >> i just want to start a new life. i will not give up. i still want to go abroad because i really want to help my mother and
too because if you remember over the weekend there was an attack in amman, jordan which they believe al qaeda in iraq was responsible for that. one of the targets in that attack was the u.s. embassy. >> would that -- again, i don't want to say what we don't know. but we know that a large number of the people who -- foreigner fighters who went to iraq to fight and kill americans and iraqis were from libya, particularly eastern libya, east of benghazi and that region. are those people who just returned home -- people involved in this attack, do we know have they just returned home and are now living in libya with this foreign terrorist experience or did they purposely come to libya for this attack? we don't know. >> it's very possible -- we don't know, but it's very possible they went home, and it kind of fits in with what we're hearing from intelligence officials, that they believe this was kind of a group of loosely band people with different loyalties and different affiliations. you know, sometimes your cousin may be a member of al qaeda in iraq, for example, and they'll pick up on
think you will see with elite level athletes, players like kobe bryant, tom brady, michael jordan, they are driven by championships. that's what was so disheartening about the whole a-rod -- stuart: yankees could actually owe him some bonuses if he hits certain milestones. that was a terrible business deal. you don't think that will inhibit others from making 3 similar long-term deals? >> i think you will see teems be wary -- teams be wary about signing players on the north side of 30 realize as they progress in their careers as they get older the productivity is going to decline. but at the same time when you have teams that are large market teams that can afford to pay the luxury tax, they will play to their strengths. they will try to outspend, sign elite level talent, beat the the small market teams. stuart: so it is worth it to the yankees. i believe this was a steinbrenner deal from way back. >> it was. in 2011 they paid almost 14 million dollars. stuart: it's worth it for a team, a marquee team to get marquee name star players? it's worth it, no matter what they have to pa
makers program. we have the chance to speak to jim jordan. and among the topics he talked about was that of libya. and the congressional investigations of the attack on the united states consulate in benghazi. he was of the oversight committee hearing this past week, in which he probed diplomatic security in libya. we will talk about that topic. but here is a bit from the news makers. >> the hearing made it clear that this quest to get to normalized security operations trumped security. politics trumped security. first of all, there are several things that stand out. it was september 11. it should be on high alert on that day. there were 230 -- security incidents as of may 13 months prior to the september 11 attacks on our consulate were the ambassador and three others were killed. 230. on the to 31, we will blamed on libya. you had repeated requests from the guys on the ground. the two guys to testify were on the ground for eight and nine months. it had been there eight and nine months. they repeatedly asked for additional help. and there were denied by people in washington, as
. >> it is spreading already. it is spreading to lebanon and jordan. >> the husband of violence. -- there has not been of violence in lebanon. at the same time, there is so many other places where you could have a fire began. -- which i think the russians are, here. >> i agree that russia is unlikely to help us in the united states. we have tried three times in the u.n.. cotton three vetoes in return. best case, maybe i was in china a few months ago. talking about, maybe they should concentrate on domestic problems, rather than having a domestic -- rather than having an aggressive domestic foreign policy. it is a possibility. i would give you my worst case, and it may be unfolding before our eyes. nato has guarantee turkey's borders. in case, what happened in just a week ago flares up -- more shelling. remember when i said in my presentation. he decides -- nonetheless, he might escalate the conflict the russians will not intervene. they said they -- their treaty with syria is not going to guarantee russian aid. we could see a nice war opening up with my then dragged into russia with the iranians. then
, threatening turkey, jordan, iraq. more and more militants are coming in who are not syrians who are taking over what was originally a much more pluralist liberal opposition. people are predicting up to a ten-year civil war. this is a humanitarian disaster. it is horrific morally and devastating to us strategically. we should -- the united states should act with the countries in the region to create a no-fly zone to protect people. there are lots of risks but the risks to nonaction are far, far greater. americans don't want to hear it. >> i will take a lot of persuading on the no-fly zone to convince me. david court wright. >> there is no plan for ending the war in afghanistan. the president says we'll be out by -- biden says yes for sure. they're planning to keep lots of troops there. the more important thing is how are we actually going to end the war in such a manner to prevent the killing from continuing? how do we work with the people of afghanistan so get a more accountable representative government that isn't just warlords and isn't taken over by the taliban? we need to be engaged in
in the country. violent attacks on our embassy. what does it take? >> it is what i said, mr. jordan. there was not any actionable intelligence. as the director of national intelligence had said. >> are these guys professionals? these guys said they needed more help. >> if i could finish my statement, sir. >> all right, and then i want to go to these guys. >> there was no actionable intelligence available that indicated there was a plan or any indication of a massive attack of the nature and lethality. >> they were not good enough? >> there was a single rocket propelled grenade fired at the red cross. there was an attack on the british compound. we analyzed those things. i should also note, for example, the french and italians and the united nations lifted that same threats -- >> mr. nordstrom, do you think there were ever going to give you what you wanted? what would warrant them saying, these guys know what they're talking about? we are going to me to the request. -- to meet that request. >> thank you for asking that question. i had that conversation when i came back on leave for t
, if the time when jordan further and they are able to produce multiple weapons and a short time -- if the time line at short and a further and they are able to produce multiple weapons in a short time -- short of them testing in nuclear weapon, the further they get in the direction of having capabilities. [inaudible] >> you could maybe blame them now because they could price it in. thank you for the question, i want to get to a couple more. maybe you could both ask a question. >> i am just curious come in your analysis, how did you factor in the uncertainty about the effectiveness of a military strike? to a already indicated if there was a military strike, as i understand, having not read your report yet, that there would be a spike up in the short term of the price of oil. there seems to be almost an assumption that there would be closer to the issue of iranian military of nuclear capability when in fact there may not be closure. and i am just curious, was there a lot of analysis to that point about just this uncertainty about the effectiveness of any military strike? >> and we will take your
in jordan to help with humanitarian crisis that is spilling in from syria. the task force says it is concerned with helping the country deal with the nearly 18,000 refugees who have come across that border. the obama administration declined to offer military support to rebels in syria fighting government forces there. so far more than 30,000 people, 30,000 people have been killed in that uprising since march in syria. bill: for the first time in nearly a month mitt romney now leading president obama in scott rasmussen's swing state survey, 49-47%. that poll tracks 11 key battleground states that the president won four years ago but now they're considered too close to call. ed rollins, fox news contributor, served as national direct for president ronald reagan's re-election team in 1984. he worked on numerous other campaigns. good to have you back. >> good morning. how are you, sir? bill: i'm fine, thank you. i want to get to specifics in a moment. generally speaking what are you seeing out there? >> momentum clearly gone toward romney. momentum is important in the closing days
work, and we are. and it's not only just america, but nato is now helping, jordan's helping train police, uae is helping train police. we've allocated $7 billion over the next months for reconstruction efforts. and we're making progress there. and our alliance is strong. and as i just told you, there's going to be a summit of the arab nations. japan will be hosting a summit. we're making progress. it is hard work. it is hard work to go from a tyranny to a democracy. it's hard work to go from a place where people get their hands cut off, or executed, to a place where people are free. but it's necessary work. and a free iraq is going to make this world a more peaceful place. >> ninety seconds, senator kerry. >> what i think troubles a lot of people in our country is that the president has just sort of described one kind of mistake. but what he has said is that, even knowing there were no weapons of mass destruction, even knowing there was no imminent threat, even knowing there was no connection with al qaida, he would still have done everything the same way. those are his words. now
, unquote. morocco, algeria, jordan have not experienced the arab spring, the recent developments have shown some changes. the political institution in some of the countries are in the process of transition with more participation. it's best if ambitious public spending plan. we have same legal system and procedures are being performed to the aspiration of the people and their yearning for a good government and transparency. now, let me turn to the american policies during the arab spring. two initiatives, these initiatives i don't think were a coincidence, but anyway they came up at the same time in 2011 and the other 12011. august 10, 2011, president obama ordered a division board. the president made the prevention of atrocities the key focus of his administration's foreign policy. this initiative aimed at civilians and holding perpetrators of atrocities accountable. the focus of this initiative is the area and libya. the other initiative come in the second initiative is the open government or airship, which announced in september 2011 but exacerbated in italy. it was launched by governmen
's jordan middle school already had a student with cf before colman arrived, the district, assistant superintendent charles young told nbc news, relied on medical authorities who said a literal physical distance must be constantly maintained between cf patients. the zero risk option, young told us, was to transfer colman to another school that's three miles away. his parents home schooling their son now have gone to court to try to reverse that decision. >> why take a child who is new to the district, who is just making friends, who is just building a support network, who is getting to know and liking his teachers, who has been well his whole life, why stigmatize him? >> colman has attended two other schools with cf children. it has never been an issue, ever. >> reporter: in some other schools cf patients are kept in separate classrooms and follow other safety guidelines preventing close contact, but here's what the doctor specializes in cf told us. >> in general, we would prefer that there not be, you know, more than one cystic fibrosis patient in a school. >> reporter: there will b
or is it going to be like iraq, jordan, bolivia, you know, the question answers itself. so the conditional probability that china will avoid the middle-income front is much higher than 50, 60 in three quarters when. so the notion that china i just don't think is likely at least if it reaches 50, 55% of the u.s. standards of living. yes, there is aging. it's a problem, but i think my number, my projection of 6.5% takes into account aging and as i said, there are lots of things china can do to overcome because it is very hard to avoid this problem. i forgot to mention that american boosters and u.s. boosters and china deniers say japan had this bubble, japan slowed down, china is in the same situation. and i say that that is fundamentally a long and how much because when china -- when japan reached that state in the late 80's and early 90's, japan was at the standard of living close to that. so, the scope for catch up to japan had was over. china is about 25%, so china japan and now what she is just plain wrong so it is related to the aging plant, so the demography's on the way that, but equ
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 56 (some duplicates have been removed)